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pre·var·i·cate
[pri-var-i-keyt]

verb (used without object), -cat·ed, -cat·ing

meaning
to speak falsely or misleadingly; deliberately misstate or create an incorrect impression; to lie.
Like · · Unfollow Post · January 17 at 2:02pm

scroop
[skroop]

noun
rustling sound made by silk or rayon fabrics

verb (used without object)
making rustling, grating, or creaking sound
The gate scrooped as he swung it shut.
Unlike · · Unfollow Post · January 16 at 10:30am


game
noun
1. an amusement or pastime; diversion
2. wild animals, including birds and fish, hunted for sport, food, or profit
3. (nformal) a trick, strategy, or device: I can see through your little game

This word 'game' could be used as a verb also.
to game the system

meaning
1. abusing the system
2. milking the system
3. manipulating the system
Like · · Unfollow Post · January 15 at 10:01am

cheesy
(cheezee)
adj

1. Like cheese in taste, smell, or consistency.
2. Cheap, unpleasant, or blatantly inauthentic.
Like · · Unfollow Post · January 14 at 12:09pm

Upcycle
verb

convert waste materials or useless products into new materials of better quality or more environmental value.
Like · · Unfollow Post · January 13 at 9:57am

nonversation
noun

a conversation that seems meaningless or ridiculous.

This word was recently added to the English language.
Like · · Unfollow Post · January 12 at 2:13pm

facepalm

also face-palm or face palm

noun [countable]
the action of placing your hand flat across your face or lowering one's face into one's hand or hands in order to show that you are frustrated or embarrassed about something

facepalm also face-palm or face palm
verb [intransitive]

zone out

Stop paying attention, dissociate oneself from a situation
He ZONED OUT during the lecture because it was so boring.

This idiom also occurs in the passive, be zoned out .
Like · · Unfollow Post · January 11 at 11:22am

newspeak

PRONUNCIATION:
(NOO-speek, NYOO-)

MEANING:
noun: Deliberately ambiguous or euphemistic language used for propaganda.

ETYMOLOGY:
Coined by George Orwell in his novel 'Nineteen Eighty-Four'. This novel is available in Islamiah College library. Newspeak was the official language of Oceania, a society ruled by a dictatorial group in the novel. In Newspeak, English was called Oldspeak. Earliest documented use: 1949.
Unlike · · Unfollow Post · January 6 at 3:56pm

mickle

PRONUNCIATION:
(MIK-uhl)

MEANING:
noun: A large amount.
adjective: Great, large.
adverb: Much.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Old English micel (much). Ultimately from the Indo-European root meg- (great), which is also the source of magnificent, maharajah, mahatma, master, mayor, maestro, magnate, magistrate, maximum, and magnify. Earliest documented use: 9th c.

NOTES:
The word appears in the proverb "Many a little makes a mickle" and sometimes in its corrupted (and meaningless) form: "Many a mickle makes a muckle."
Like · · Unfollow Post · January 1 at 8:51pm











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